This blog is intended to go along with Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues, by John R. Weeks, published by Cengage Learning. The latest edition is the 12th (it came out in 2015), but this blog is meant to complement any edition of the book by showing the way in which demographic issues are regularly in the news.

If you are a user of my textbook and would like to suggest a blog post idea, please email me at: john.weeks@sdsu.edu

Sunday, February 14, 2016

Valentine's Day Demographics--Matching Up By Occupation (or not)

I love it when people do innovative things with demographic data and Adam Pearce and Dorothy Gambrell have done that for Bloomberg Business. They pulled together data from the American Community Survey for 2014 that matched up the occupation of spouses living in the same household, to see "who marries whom?"
When it comes to falling in love, it’s not just fate that brings people together—sometimes it’s their jobs. We scanned data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 American Community Survey—which covers 3.5 million households—to find out how people are pairing up. Some of the matches seemed practical (the most common marriage is between grade-school teachers), and others had us questioning Cupid’s aim (why do female dancers have a thing for male welders?). High-earning women (doctors, lawyers) tend to pair up with their economic equals, while middle- and lower-tier women often marry up. In other words, female CEOs tend to marry other CEOs; male CEOs are OK marrying their secretaries.
The graphic is interactive, so you really have to check it out yourself, but here's the graph for physicians and surgeons and who they marry:


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